Deboullie Mountain and Fire Lookout Tower; North Maine Woods

Total Mileage: 4.7 Miles                          Directions  to check point 46.779432,-68.566218

Total rise: 1010′                                                              Facebook

Hike Time: 3 hours withe 3 kids                                  My Pintrest

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Significance: Fire tower, views                                ALL FIRE TOWER PAGE

Printable map                                                  Trail Head->46.964123,-68.838138

Here is some of what you need to know: Before you get there, listen to me: This is the North Maine Woods and it is the wilderness, be prepared. There is a gas station when you exit I-95, then it is a solid hour before you reach another.

-The GPS Directions takes you to the check point gate, get a road map when you pay your Fees, have them highlight the route. From the checkpoint it is 25 miles of well maintained logging roads until you get to the trail-head parking area; do not show up with an 1/8 of a tank of gas and no supplies in the car. My Toyota Camry did fine on the roads.

-The roads are not hard to navigate: follow the Red River Campground (RRC) signs, they are red. Set your odometer to 0 at the checkpoint, we missed a turn at mile 14.5 (about 25 minutes), the sign was a little hard to see.

-If you hit a moose, it is yours to keep…good luck.

 

1. Scroll the mouse over the altitude line to see where it lines up on the map

2. Click on the flags for more information

3. Click on the pictures to make them large

 

The sign offers two paths to the tower, we took the shorter

As you approach the parking area you will be driving on a tight dirt road with the lake on your left; it will not take long before you reach a fairly large well defined parking area, the trail-head is marked.(-FYI)

The trail intersections have signs, the first one was about 0.3 miles in and gives two options for getting to the tower; the shorter route is along the lake and that is what we took. The trail was well maintained with very few rocks. Keep an eye out for the short path that takes you to the lake, you will get a great view of Deboullie mtn. At 1.3 miles you will come to the boulder field which was very cool; the rocks were all around and traveled at least a hundred feet up the mountain. We had no trouble walking across the rocks, many had been re-positioned to make it easy to cross.

 

Early on a short spur trail takes you to a view of Deboullie Mountain; the tower and rock field are visible, Click pic to enlarge.

The boulder field

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.2 miles past the rock field the trail turns up hill, you will climb 800 feet over 0.7 miles. It is a workout for sure but you probably just sat in the car for 3 hours so you could use it (seriously the minimal distance up hill makes it very reasonable). The trail was in good condition all the way up.

 

 

 

This was the first tower I encountered with a vertical ladder to the top; the kids had no interest in climbing it but I think the 8 year old would have been fine if I was right behind him. It is a long climb but you are almost encased in metal all the way up making it feel safe; at the top of the ladder you must push a small door upwards (pictured below) to gain access to the cab. I will admit I was a bit nervous going from the cab back onto the latter but it turned out easier than I thought.

Four windows allow for a view in all directions; several lakes are visible from the tower and many hundreds of thousands of trees of course. To the south you can see Round Top mountain and a distant mount Katahdin. The north is mainly flat and Canada is only a few miles away.

 

 

The only way out; it was not as bad as it looked, but it gave me the heebeejeebees.

Round Top on left, Katahdin in right background. Click on pic to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canada about 4 miles north, the way the crow flies.

Deboullie pond the foremost

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As far as I know this tower is the farthest north on the east coast; it is absolutely worth making the drive to see it. You have to come see and feel the wilderness. Spend the night in one of the campsites that dot the land between the lake and the road and you will see a starry night that few on the east coast ever see. Check out our other east coast fire towers; get out and enjoy the view.

 

 

 

 

 

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